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Queens

Seagirt Boulevard
Community Garden

30-03 Seagirt Boulevard

Queens, New York

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HOURS

All NYRP community gardens must hold a minimum of 20 open hours per week. Please check the bulletin board at the garden for times and details. 

 

Garden Coordinator

Sharon Keller

 

 

Established in 1992, this garden is well-used by community members to grow and raise a variety of fresh vegetables and produce. Each summer and fall, local families harvest large amounts of tomatoes, peanuts, collard greens, pepper and corn – providing healthy meals and replenishing seasonal food supplies. The garden’s most dedicated tenders are a small and mainly elderly group of neighborhood residents, many of whom live on fixed incomes and for whom the site is an important source of fresh produce.

With its lovely mulberry, dogwood and Japanese maple trees, the garden also serves as a popular location to host barbecues and picnics within a short walk of the Atlantic Ocean. In 2004, New York Restoration Project (NYRP) installed a rod-iron fence, shed and picnic table. To support the garden’s primary use as a vegetable, herb and fruit garden, in 2008 NYRP added a new perennial bed to the front of the garden, which includes lavender, cat mint and bayberry shrubs.  In May 2009, NYRP horticulture crews also planted a beach plum tree at the site.

In addition, in 2009 NYRP partnered with Far Rockaway Waterfront Alliance to provide environmental education programming opportunities to local schoolchildren, instructing students on urban agriculture and how to grow their own food.

To help ensure the garden continues to serve as an active green space and engages local residents for years to come, NYRP staff and horticulture crews work with community members to remove trash and provide ongoing maintenance, building assistance and plant material for the garden – including wood for raised planting beds, gardening tools, compost and vegetable seedlings.

Located in the Far Rockaway section of Queens, this 6,000-square-foot garden is surrounded by a neighborhood comprised of one- and two-family homes and multi-family apartments whose residents are primarily of African-American descent.